Watershed Manager

Watershed Manager 

Main Topic: Places and Regions
Secondary Topic: Environment and Society
 

Overview: Watershed Managers design systems and policy to ensure public safety and ecological protection. Watershed Managers are responsible for creating, developing and implementing plans for the management of water systems. This will include effective works for water supply and sewage but will also mean decision making for implementing programs and projects related to floodwater managementRecently, the role has expanded to include ecological responsibilities, access rights, ownership and ensuring that all have access to water. Their skills are required in agriculture where they design programs for proper handling of sediments and ground nutrients - some of which carries potential pollutants. They also work as part of water management and planning teams in urban landscapes. Here, they must plan for potential industrial pollution and that from household waste entering the water ecosystem. They are involved in flood mitigation, flood management and ensuring that sewer systems are properly to cope with increased water run-off, if not for the sewer system itself. Effective water management is essential for public health and quality of life. Watershed Managers will spend their time in the field collecting samples and in offices devising plans, compiling reports and systems for discussing of decision makers and implementation by engineers and other on-the-ground workers. Some general duties include: Monitor, manage and maintain bodies of water, including lakes, ponds, streams and watershed, including water quality and erosion controlMonitor maintenance activities for lakes, ponds, streams and dams and schedules and implement maintenance and inventory activitiesMonitor and implement erosion/sedimentation control related to construction sites and develop costs for such projectsOversee maintenance and development of dams, spillways, stream channels, shorelines, docks and bulkheadsInvestigate new techniques to maintain, protect and enhance water quality and related resources. 

Geographers at work: Physical Geographers, Environmental Geographers, Hazards Geographers 

Recommended College Courses: Physical Geography, Geographic Information Systems, Environmental Management, Quantitative Methods, Hazards Management, Human Geography, Regional Geography, Qualitative Methods 

Skills: Field Methods, Environmental Science, Environmental Planning, Hazards Planning, Natural Resource Planning 

paces - environment

Written by Christopher Hinojosa